On Being a Boat Dog

Me and my girl leaving Puerto Escondido. This is where the blanket monster lives.

Me and my girl leaving Puerto Escondido. This is where the blanket monster lives.

You have lived your life on land. Existence is good. There is yard, a nice bed, and a readily available, steady supply of food. Your humans take you for walks, you get to bark at the squirrels and reclaim your territory each new day. Then one day, your humans start putting stuff in boxes.

It happens fast. There are more boxes and strange humans coming to the house and leaving with things that all smell like your humans. A few months go by and you are loaded into the truck and driven to a new den surrounded by water and new, unfamiliar smells.

This den never stops moving. We will go days without shore. The first time this happened, I was scared to pee. They wanted me to go on the den but I didn’t want to be a bad dog. After two days, I finally gave in. My humans were happy, so, now I have a place to go without shore. There have been times I could not smell shore for days. There were strange water dogs that jumped and moved beside the den; I peed on them and they went away. When the den moves a lot, it gets really loud and my humans let me sleep with them. It makes me sleepy and my tummy sometimes hurts.

When the den is tied to land, my humans still take me to shore and on walks. There is a small water car tied to the den I like to ride in. There are a lot of new smells and sounds. I keep my humans safe and play with my girl.

Time to make sure the blanket monster isn’t causing trouble.

– Rover

2 thoughts on “On Being a Boat Dog

  1. Martha

    And who was the human that has always thought you should?……i.e.
    “If Dec could dance he’d be in Dog Lake”
    Age 3

    Reply

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